“Listen, I tell you a mystery!”

Today’s stage of the pilgrimage included a visit to the ancient site of Eleusis, by special request of Dr Mark Vernon. He explains why.

Eleusis is off the beaten track when it comes to following in the footsteps of Paul. This is, in part, good. First, its temples, porticos and ceremonial ways are not filled with other visitors. Second, the silence of the fallen marble still speaks of how it was a thin place, somewhere that countless individuals received insight and consolation in the face of the great issues of life and death. I recommend a visit.

Entering the site of Eleusis

Entering the site of Eleusis

It’s the home of the Eleusinian Mysteries and, because of its tremendous influence particularly in Roman times, is really as much a part of Christian history and experience as Paul’s teaching on the second coming in Thessalonica or the centrality of love in Corinth.

We speak of baptism and the Eucharist as sacraments and mysteries. We take communion, engage rites of initiation, prepare ourselves to receive God with fasting, sacred meals, festivities, pilgrimages, liturgies. They transform lives and deliver the kind of knowledge that can’t be read on a page. Such elements have many sources, but the link to the ancient mysteries is thoroughly in the mix.

It’s worth saying a word about the word “mystery” because it can be mystifying. This is a shame as it is a simple idea of which everyone has experience. The word comes from the Greek verb for “to close” (hence, myopic). Recipients of mysteries closed their eyes – that is, they were shown things that eyes alone can’t see. To put it another way, a mystery is a direct experience of truth. It’s unmediated by words, objects or rites – although words, objects and rites are the vehicles that carry the individual to the moment when the direct experience shows itself.

The Telesterion

The Telesterion

The journey of Holy Week, particularly through the Triduum or Three Days, is a good example (and is another link with Eleusis, since the ancient mysteries involved a journey of several days to and from Athens). The liturgies on Maundy Thursday and Good Friday carry the congregation to the bleak heart of the emptiness of death, and then, through Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday, to an experience of the mystery and joy of resurrection. The Easter Vigil in the early hours of the morning on Easter Sunday offers a direct sense of the light that shines in the darkness that the darkness does not comprehend.

It seems highly likely that Paul utilizes the language of the mysteries too, not least in his letters to the Corinthians. They lived within easy reach of Eleusis and would have recognised links when he wrote things like, “Listen, I tell you a mystery!” Or, “What you sow does not come to life unless it dies” – because the Eleusinian mysteries were deeply linked to growth and the seasons. Or again when he cited Isaiah, “Death has been swallowed up in victory” – because the mysteries involved a swallowing up in the earth before a release into a new, richer life.

Seating carved into the rock created the feel of a theatre - for liturgy

Seating carved into the rock created the feel of a theatre – for liturgy

Personally, I think that there may even be a direct link to Paul. One of his named converts in Athens is Dionysius the Areopagite. The name was to have an enormous impact upon subsequent theology when, in the late 5th century AD, a Christian Neoplatonic philosopher adopted it. Under Dionysius’s name, he wrote works including Divine Names, Mystical Theology and Celestial Hierarchy, now referred to as authored by Pseudo-Dionysius or Pseudo-Denys. They could claim to be some of the most influential books in Christianity. And perhaps the original Dionysius was an Eleusinian initiate before he was a Christian. Perhaps this is why he was open to Paul’s teaching on resurrection when Paul arrived in Athens. And perhaps Dionysius began a school of mysticism within Christianity that came to fruition in the 5th century texts.

The former dean of St Paul’s cathedral, William Ralph Inge – Dean Inge, wrote an accessible book on mysticism, Christian Mysticism (it’s widely available online – http://bit.ly/1Chwt5G). He offers a useful summary of what happened at Eleusis in an appendix, and why it matters to Christians. He concludes: “It is plain that this is one of the cases in which Christianity conquered Hellenism by borrowing from it all its best elements; and I do not see a Christian need feel any reluctance to make this admission.” Personally, I think that this adoption of the practice and theology of the mysteries is crucial to knowing the life in all its fullness that Jesus lived and taught, and Paul so profoundly experienced and knew.

Mark Vernon

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